Five Truths of Editing Fiction No One Tells You

Red Pen for Editing
Photo by ulleo via Pixabay

This is my latest on Coffee House Writers. You can find the full article here.

Five Truths of Editing Fiction No One Tells You

I’ve been chronicling my experience with editing here at Coffee House Writers with some of my past articles. “Starting Over: Mirroring Kristin Cashore’s Writing of Bitterblue” was about how rewriting the whole story was my original plan. “An Editing Process for Pantsers” mentioned a very analytical way of evaluating each scene and figuring out whether it was worth keeping.

I have been indecisive about how to edit, to say the least. This is, in part, because of the editing everyone talks about versus what it will actually look like.

We need an honest conversation about what the editing process entails.

When someone says the word “editing,” what do you see? A red pen fixing punctuation errors, awkward wording and grammar? That’s what I imagined. I didn’t realize one of the biggest secrets of editing: editing is, at its heart, rewriting.

Because of the common misconceptions about writing, I decided to list out the truths of editing. I stumbled across these through editing my novel.

Truth #1: Editing is Rewriting

In truth, everything after the first draft is editing. You must rewrite scenes, add scenes, delete scenes, and everything in between to get to the polished-draft phase. Everything you write after the first completed draft is editing, even if you are writing a completely new sequence of scenes for the first half of your book.

Truth #2: You Will Cut 90 Percent Of Your First Draft

I wrote 61,000 words for my first draft. The first 42,000 words will be completely rewritten. Some of the later scenes [Read More]

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